Kade looks and acts like a runaway. And with his parents breathing down his neck about college applications and baseball scholarships, he almost wishes he were one. So when Agent Boone approaches him with the opportunity to go undercover and disappear, Kade can’t believe his luck.

Sightings of high-profile missing kids from all over the country have poured in through the years in the small, old-timey towns of Jessup, Martin, and Clydesville. The tips turn up nothing, but the townsfolk tell tales of an old, possibly haunted, house set deep in the woods that separate the towns. Kade is given one mission: to find the house and, if the kids are there, to convince them he’s one of them.

Kade enjoys his stress-free days in the three-story, Victorian-style house surrounded by nothing but miles of woods, and finds himself wanting to abort the mission and just live this new life with new people who expect nothing of him. Yeah, Ian—the guy in charge—has it out for him for some reason and says he’s not allowed to leave the house, but why would he want to anyway? Still, he can’t help but wonder where Ian goes every day when he wanders off into the woods. Quickly, Kade realizes that he is not the only one with a secret, and he must take it upon himself to crack a case much bigger than the one he signed up for. Especially if he wants to ever get himself and the kids out alive.

Get a copy here: http://www.amazon.com/The-Runaway-House-Courtney-Parker-ebook/dp/B00JEHOENE/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1396389482&sr=8-4&keywords=the+runaway+house

Kade looks and acts like a runaway. And with his parents breathing down his neck about college applications and baseball scholarships, he almost wishes he were one. So when Agent Boone approaches him with the opportunity to go undercover and disappear, Kade can’t believe his luck.

Sightings of high-profile missing kids from all over the country have poured in through the years in the small, old-timey towns of Jessup, Martin, and Clydesville. The tips turn up nothing, but the townsfolk tell tales of an old, possibly haunted, house set deep in the woods that separate the towns. Kade is given one mission: to find the house and, if the kids are there, to convince them he’s one of them.

Kade enjoys his stress-free days in the three-story, Victorian-style house surrounded by nothing but miles of woods, and finds himself wanting to abort the mission and just live this new life with new people who expect nothing of him. Yeah, Ian—the guy in charge—has it out for him for some reason and says he’s not allowed to leave the house, but why would he want to anyway? Still, he can’t help but wonder where Ian goes every day when he wanders off into the woods. Quickly, Kade realizes that he is not the only one with a secret, and he must take it upon himself to crack a case much bigger than the one he signed up for. Especially if he wants to ever get himself and the kids out alive.

Get a copy here: http://www.amazon.com/The-Runaway-House-Courtney-Parker-ebook/dp/B00JEHOENE/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1396389482&sr=8-4&keywords=the+runaway+house

(Source: drzank, via johncoreywhaley)

Please Vote for My Book!

virtualbunny:

Cheshire Cat

virtualbunny:

Cheshire Cat

(via boroondaralibraries)

She said, ‘I’m so afraid.’ And I said, ‘why?,’ and she said, ‘Because I’m so profoundly happy. Happiness like this is frightening.’ I asked her why and she said, ‘They only let you be this happy if they’re preparing to take something from you.’

Khaled Hosseini, The Kite Runner (2003)

(Source: larmoyante, via booksandghosts)

yeahwriters:

erinbowman:

fuckyeahharrypotter:

Harry Potter locations

(Source: ofabeautifulnight, via yeahwriters)

bibliolectors:

Classification in the Library / Clasificación en la Biblioteca (ilustración de Jiri Sliva)

bibliolectors:

Classification in the Library / Clasificación en la Biblioteca (ilustración de Jiri Sliva)

(via smuwritingcentre)

amandaonwriting:

As The Plot Thickens Mystery Bookshop in Kingston, Ontario, Canada.

amandaonwriting:

As The Plot Thickens Mystery Bookshop in Kingston, Ontario, Canada.

(Source: calycat, via aliteraryescape)

You should read the book that you see someone on the train reading and trying to hide that they’re laughing.

You should read the book that you see someone on the train reading and trying to hide that they’re crying.

You should read the book you find in your grandparents’ house that’s inscribed “To Ray, all my love, Christmas 1949.”

You should read books mentioned in other books.

Over at The Millions, Janet Potter, who has worked in bookstores all over the world for more than a decade, responds to Amazon’s 100 Books to Read in a Lifetime and similar rankings with a beautiful blueprint to the reading life.

Pair with Joseph Brodsky on how to develop your taste in reading.

(via explore-blog)

(via booksandghosts)